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Postby Laxative Effect » Thu Sep 05, 2013 9:11 pm


djmenow wrote:
Liberal brings out costings and this type of thing 2 days out from the election after the blackout of ads and promotion etc What a bunch of cunning cunts. No matter who gets in will screw us but fuck it Im voting Palmer just to fuck em all up.

What happened to freedom of shit.


This whole election has become a shamble. I'm not going to vote this time. I see NO party that is worth my time. I'm just going to cop the fine and be done with it.

As for freedom, these is no such thing in this (post 911) world anymore.


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Postby Macc » Thu Sep 05, 2013 9:47 pm


Laxative Effect wrote:
This whole election has become a shamble. I'm not going to vote this time. I see NO party that is worth my time. I'm just going to cop the fine and be done with it.

You only have to turn up at a polling place and get your name marked off to avoid the fine. You don't actually have to cast a valid vote.


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Postby phunkyfeelone » Thu Sep 05, 2013 10:55 pm


Aaaaand retracted...for now.

http://www.news.com.au/technology/inter ... 6712390937

But Mr Abbott, you can still go fuck yourself.


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Postby spazzenger » Thu Sep 05, 2013 11:06 pm


Yep was about to post another link. Wonder why the sudden flip. Still, Abbott is far too conservative for my liking.


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Postby wolverine » Thu Sep 05, 2013 11:08 pm


What a joke... Malcom Turnbull defends the policy on radio, then they drop less than 3 hours later. When asked why he defended it, he said he read it briefly before going to air. So can I ask you Mr future communications minister - how come you were not involved in designing this policy, you were given it to read just before going to air? What sort of communications minister are you going to make?


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Postby phunkyfeelone » Thu Sep 05, 2013 11:28 pm


wolverine wrote:
What a joke... Malcom Turnbull defends the policy on radio, then they drop less than 3 hours later. When asked why he defended it, he said he read it briefly before going to air. So can I ask you Mr future communications minister - how come you were not involved in designing this policy, you were given it to read just before going to air? What sort of communications minister are you going to make?


^What he said

If the Shadow Communications Minister is not fully briefed and aware of the complete content of one of only 2 real communications policies (NBN and this), I'd question his ability to manage if he was elected and actually had to implement them...

Turnbull is the only sane head from the Coalition, but mistakes like this damage his brand...


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Postby SKaVeN » Fri Sep 06, 2013 4:11 pm


At-a-glance: Compare the major parties' policies


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Postby atefooterz » Sat Oct 12, 2013 7:54 am


What you will not read in newscorpse papers or hear on Am talkback...
Quote:
Asylum Seekers and Refugees: Putting Things in Perspective
By Febi Yonesta on 12:29 pm October 11, 2013.
Category Commentary, Opinion
Tags: asylum seekers, Australia Prime Minister Tony Abbott

Following the visit of Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott to Indonesia and the commitment of both governments to work together to address the movement of asylum seekers and refugees in the region, SUAKA — the Indonesian Civil Society Network for Refugee Protection — reminds the Indonesian public of our humanitarian values. We are shocked about how fast Indonesian political leaders will agree to follow the immoral behavior and statements from the new prime minister of Australia, who clearly sets his own political interests before human rights and the interests of the region. Denying people fleeing persecution of their right to protection, and criminalizing them, is nothing to be proud of.

Despite recent positive steps to increase the regional protection space for asylum seekers and refugees in the Jakarta Declaration, we are shocked to hear Indonesia’s president speaking about asylum seekers and refugees as an economic and social problem, and we want to clarify some of the misunderstandings that have come about due to myths that distort public opinion in Australia and Indonesia.

Asylum seekers and refugees are not the problem; conflicts and disregard of human rights in their countries of origin, transit and destination are. People claiming asylum flee because they are in need of international protection following persecution and severe human rights violations, including torture, in their home country. What they encounter during their flight from persecution is political point-scoring by Australian and Indonesian politicians.

Economically, the people of Indonesia benefit from asylum seekers and refugees renting houses and purchasing goods, but more importantly, our nation, which is already diverse and multicultural, stands to gain from the contributions that asylum seekers can bring to their new homes. Albert Einstein, Henry Kissinger, Madeleine Albright, Sigmund Freud, Bob Marley, Victor Hugo, Isabel Allende and Khaled Hosseini are among famous refugees who made names for themselves after fleeing persecution. Countless others throughout history work tirelessly in their country of refuge to make new lives and become part of their new communities.

For Australia and Indonesia, refugees are an opportunity not only to learn about other countries and cultures but also to grow together as neighbors. Many refugees live years in Indonesia, learn about local culture and language before they are resettled in Australia, eventually becoming Australian citizens with high regard for their neighbor country that welcomed them during their most difficult days. Many sustain contact with friends made on their journey to safety. They and future generations have the potential to become a strong link between the two nations, as their connection is based on real-life experiences of solidarity and brotherhood, something that is still very weak between our two countries.

As the solidarity of Indonesian people with Rohingya asylum seekers from Myanmar has shown, Indonesian people are welcoming some of the most rejected and persecuted people in Asean. Why then does the Indonesian government label them as a social problem? It seems that the Indonesian public is more willing to practice solidarity and show humanitarian support than its political elite.

Indonesian authorities continue to take advantage of desperate people fleeing for their lives, both directly by asking for bribes, and indirectly by benefiting from the Australian government’s payments to Indonesia to arrest and detain asylum seekers on Indonesian soil. SUAKA would like to suggest a study to identify the real social and economic impact, before our government echoes Australian statements that are clearly part of their own political agenda.

If the Indonesian government helps in Abbott’s “turn back the boats” policy, which pushes back asylum seekers who are desperately trying to reach a country that can ensure their protection, SUAKA notes that both countries will risk international condemnation by endangering the lives of asylum seekers. We saw a similar situation in Thailand in 2009, when Thai security forces towed boats of Rohingya asylum seekers back out to sea, setting them adrift in the open ocean without serviceable engines or sufficient food and water. At the time this caused widespread outrage and protest from around the world; now Abbott wants to implement a version of this policy in collaboration with Indonesia.

To put things in perspective, the majority of asylum seekers and refugees in the region are not living in Australia or Indonesia, but in countries like Bangladesh, Pakistan and Iran. Millions of refugees receive minimum standards of protection there. It is appalling that Australia as a developed country is not willing to accept even a tiny proportion, about 1 percent of these people in distress, disregarding humanitarian principles and human rights by sending people arriving on its shores off to other impoverished countries like Nauru and Papua New Guinea.

SUAKA calls on the Indonesian government and the Indonesian public to stand up against the dehumanized and immoral tone of the debate and make a strong stand for the protection of people fleeing persecution. If Australia does not want to set an example in the region by offering protection and standing up for the rights of refugees, then Indonesia should take on this role.

As peacekeepers in some of the world’s most troubled countries, Indonesia has shown it is willing to make a contribution to world peace. As a leader in Asean, Indonesia has advocated for human rights protection. Instead of being poisoned by Australian partisan politics and xenophobia, Indonesia can be a leader in promoting regional efforts to protect people fleeing persecution.

Febi Yonesta is the spokesman of SUAKA, the Indonesian Civil Society Network for Refugee Protection, and director of the Jakarta Legal Aid Foundation (LBH Jakarta)

Source thejakartaglobe com/opinion/asylum-seekers-and-refugees-putting-things-in-perspective/
Posted in full as the story may dissapear from the site as new stories are published daily.


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Postby phunkyfeelone » Sat Oct 12, 2013 10:37 am


atefooterz wrote:
What you will not read in newscorpse papers or hear on Am talkback...
Quote:
Asylum Seekers and Refugees: Putting Things in Perspective
By Febi Yonesta on 12:29 pm October 11, 2013.
Category Commentary, Opinion
Tags: asylum seekers, Australia Prime Minister Tony Abbott

Febi Yonesta is the spokesman of SUAKA, the Indonesian Civil Society Network for Refugee Protection, and director of the Jakarta Legal Aid Foundation (LBH Jakarta)

Source thejakartaglobe com/opinion/asylum-seekers-and-refugees-putting-things-in-perspective/
Posted in full as the story may dissapear from the site as new stories are published daily.


Thanks for posting ate

A complex issue that, on the whole, Australia handles poorly compared to other nations, since we have had successive governments who A. Try to make it someone else's problem (Liberal) or bury their head in the sand hoping it will go away (Labour).

There are a few considerations to trying to find an answer:
1. What causes people to flee their country of origin
2. If they choose or are forced to do so, how to get them out safely without criminal involvement
3. How to transport safely to a country that will provide protection
4. How to process and identify each individual
5. How to provide support to give them a chance to contribute to their host country

This issue is not confined to Australia - every country has asylum seekers, and more asylum seekers come by plane than by boat.
Just turning them back is not addressing the issue. When a fire is burning, you don't push it toward your neighbour's house, you cut off the source and try to put it out.

The UN need to step up and provide a global standard for the treatment of refugees, to ensure they are treated fairly and with dignity.
Failure to comply will result in exclusions from the UN (and given we have a seat on the security council, this would be catastrophic for Abbott).

My parents and brothers arrived in AU by boat, not as refugees, but as part of the early 70's European migration push. When they arrived, they stayed for 9 months in an immigration hostel, trying to find work and being racially profiled (my Dad has dark skin, mum is white).


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Postby HumphreyBBear » Mon Apr 23, 2018 3:06 pm


Barnaby Joyce's autobiography to be published in August

So, I know I've been waiting all my life with bated breath for Barnaby's life to be in print, and I will rush out and buy ten copies. But, what I really want to know is; what should be the title of Barnaby's Autobiography?

How about, "At least I don't shoot blanks"? :cofee:


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